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deVivre Blog

Blog - Your weekly dose of joie deVivre.

Old is gone and new is here!

(photo courtesy of NYBG)

We're not big on resolutions, but if we had to make one, it would be to enjoy all the amazing things NYC has to offer, everyday. Here are some fun happenings around our lovely city..

Treats & Eats

1. "New York Botanical Garden's wildly popular mini wonderland—constructed entirely out of plant-based materials—returns this year...the wintry landscape extends for late-night hours with starlit ice-sculpting exhibits, fire-and-light performances courtesy of Cirque de Light and yuletide sips like apple cider and spiked hot chocolate from the Bavarian-themed, outdoor Frosty's Schnapps Haus." raves Timeout NYC. Tickets, which include a complimentary drink, are available for Friday & Saturday evenings through the 16th of Jan.

2. With the weather dipping, who doesn't crave a delicious cassoulet? Jimmy's No. 43 - East Village favorite - hosts their 8th Annual Cassoulet Cookoff this Sunday, Jan 10th.  A portion of the  proceeds will go to NYC's Grow Greenmarket initiatives. "Sample 10+ cassoulets in a walk-around event. Your first American beer/wine/cider is included in the ticket price."

Sights & Sounds"

1. This month, I highly recommend Staceyann Chin’s MotherStruck! directed by Cynthia Nixon at The Lynn Redgrave Theater running through Jan 29th. "MotherStruck! sets forth Staceyann Chin’s personal journey to motherhood as a single woman, lesbian and activist who does not have health insurance or a “serious, stable financial set up,” but wants to have a child. Told through Chin’s uniquely personal and poetic lens, this solo show explores how the process changed her life and how she makes peace with what she learns from this profound experience."

2. Not to be missed at MOMA, "Picasso Sculpture is a sweeping survey of Pablo Picasso’s innovative and influential work in three dimensions. Over the course of his long career, Picasso devoted himself to sculpture wholeheartedly, if episodically, using both traditional and unconventional materials and techniques. Unlike painting, in which he was formally trained and through which he made his living, sculpture occupied a uniquely personal and experimental status for Picasso. He approached the medium with the freedom of a self-taught artist, ready to break all the rules."